Małgorzata Zielińska

Place, migration and learning: Polish adult migrants in Reykjavik

Full text // PDF //

Abstract

Abstract

This article focuses on Polish migration to the Reykjavik capital area. Through semi-structured interviews with Polish migrants in Reykjavik and an ethnographic observation, I try to deduce what places mean for modern Central European migrants. The results show complex relations between migrants and the places they live in. Working conditions, nature and social relations matter most for migrants, while the political sphere and the possibility of democratic voice are considered almost irrelevant.

 

Karolina Kowalska

Does post-enlargement emigration from Poland impact on the wages of Poles?

Full text // PDF //

Abstract

Abstract

The purpose of this study is to empirically examine the impact emigration has had on real wages in Poland after its accession to the EU. The elasticity of wages with respect to emigration is examined using the Polish LFS, conducted from 2004 to 2009. The results show that a 10% decrease in the labour force caused by emigration brings about a 2-4% increase in wages. Some divisions of the dataset and the investigation show significant differences in the results for different socio-demographic groups, defined with regard to sex, age or employment sector. Two separate periods of prosperity and recession were also taken into account in the analyses.

 

Zinovijus Ciupijus

Talking about ‘labour camps’ in post-2004 Europe: lived experiences of work, transnational mobility and exploitation among Central Eastern European Migrants

Full text // PDF //

Abstract

Abstract

The eastern enlargement of the European Union, and the freedom of movement of people associated with it, has been treated as one of the major steps in promoting the rights of Central Eastern Europeans. In this view, Central Eastern European workers should be able to exercise new mobility rights and secure dignified, legal employment in the enlarged European Union.  The data presented in this paper casts doubt on this benign vision of intra-European mobility and the work experiences related to it. The analysis focuses on one workplace – a repackaging plant in the North of England. It has been described by interviewed workers as a ‘labour camp’, a notion which invokes memories of forced labour migration in Central Eastern Europe, carried out by 20th century totalitarian regimes. The discussion examines workplace experiences, explores workers narratives and, finally, offers workers’ testimonies against the official EU narrative of freedom of movement of labour.

 

Anastasiya Ryabchuk

Perpetuation and transformation of the split-household strategy of labour migrants: the case of a Carpathian village

Full text // PDF //

Abstract

Abstract

This paper attempts to discover the factors that may be contributing to the perpetuation or transformation of the “split-household” strategy of labour migrants from the Transcarpathian region in Western Ukraine. It addresses both structural and cultural factors, contextualises current migration strategies historically, and contributes to the literature on the impact of labour migration on sending communities and family dynamics in migrant families. Looking at the case of migrants from one village, this paper demonstrates that remaining mobile is perceived by migrants as the most certain way of achieving stability in an unstable capitalist order.

 

Tessa Savvidis

Labour migration in the post-Soviet/CIS Space: a system of complementarity?

Full text // PDF //

Abstract

Abstract

With regard to migration, the Commonwealth of Independent States (CIS) can be described as the jointly continued administration of the legacy of the USSR by its independent successor states, with a common, generally visa-free labour market as one of its most attractive features. Labour migration in the post-Soviet space, in terms of numbers, is the second largest regional migration system in the world, determined by a shared past of internal migration and current inequalities in economic advancement. The economies of participating migrant sending states are typically developing, whereas those of recipient countries can be described as newly advanced and/or rich in commodities. Whereas at least one of the major migrant receiving countries—Russia—has a long history of state controlled or instigated voluntary and involuntary migration movements, migrant recipients Ukraine and Kazakhstan lack this experience. In all source states there exists neither tradition nor experience of governing national labour markets and poverty.

 

emecon No 1/2012